Publications

False discovery in the analysis of interactions as a function of the distributional and metric properties of the outcome

Published in PsyArXiv, 2021

Focusing on a variety of models for non-continuously distributed outcomes (binary, count, and ordinal outcomes), we show that attempts to use the linear model for estimating interaction effects can be catastrophic in some settings.

Recommended citation: Domingue, B.W., Kanopka, K., Trejo, S., and Trucker-Drob, E. (2021). False discovery in the analysis of interactions as a function of the distributional and metric properties of the outcome. Preprint available: https://psyarxiv.com/932fm/ https://psyarxiv.com/932fm/

Variation in respondent speed and its implications: Evidence from an adaptive testing scenario

Published in PsyArXiv, 2021

We take advantage of a large dataset from the adaptive NWEA MAP Growth Reading Assessment to shed light on emergent features of response time behavior, identifying two behaviors in particular.

Recommended citation: Domingue, B.W., Kanopka, K., Stenhaug, B., Soland, J., Kuhfeld, M., Wise, S., & Piech, C. (In press, 2021). Variation in respondent speed and its implications: Evidence from an adaptive testing scenario. Preprint available: https://psyarxiv.com/r54ec/ https://psyarxiv.com/r54ec/

Rapid online assessment of reading ability

Published in Scientific Reports, 2021

The self-administered, Rapid Online Assessment of Reading ability (ROAR) developed here overcomes the constraints of resource-intensive, in-person reading assessment, and provides an efficient and automated tool for effective online research into the mechanisms of reading (dis)ability.

Recommended citation: Yeatman, J. D., Tang, K. A., Donnelly, P. M., Yablonski, M., Ramamurthy, M., Karipidis, I. I., Caffarra, S., Takada, M. E., Kanopka, K., Ben-Shachar, M., & Domingue, B. W. (2021). Rapid Online Assessment of Reading Ability. Scientific reports, 11(1), 1-11. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-85907-x

Are Changes in Reported Social-Emotional Skills Just Noise? The Predictive Power of Longitudinal Differences in Self-Reports

Published in Under review, 2020

We show that changes in self-reported social-emotional skills predict changes in both achievement and attendance.

Recommended citation: Kanopka, K., Claro, S., Loeb, S., West, M., & Fricke, H. (Under review). Are Changes in Reported Social-Emotional Skills Just Noise? The Predictive Power of Longitudinal Differences in Self-Reports. https://www.edpolicyinca.org/sites/default/files/2020-07/wp_kanopka_july2020.pdf